With day one and Kjeragbolten done, it was time to look forward to day two on Preikestolen! Were we a little crazy to do two hikes in the same weekend? Maybe, but we wanted to take full advantage of our weekend! Also, conquering Kjerag was a pretty big confidence boost. Sure, I was a little sore and tired the next day, but the hardest hike was over and I had stood on top of the world!

 

 

 

Getting to Preikestolen, also known as Pulpit Rock, was a little less intensive that getting to Kjerag, and luckily we didn’t have to wake up at 6 in the morning. We just had to walk about 10 minutes to the pier and take a ferry to Tau. From there it was about 30 minutes by bus to the foot of the hike. There is only the one bus to Kjerag, but becausPreikestolen is just an hour of travel away, the bus and ferry run constantly throughout the day. This means that if you want, you can sleep in a little and you can take your time on the hike. I don’t necessarily recommend this though, especially in peak season. The ferries that leave between about 9 or 10 am and noon will be packed with tourists, and then you will be stuck in the throng all the way up the mountain.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pulpit Rock is rated as a pretty easy hike, and takes about 4 hours, 5 including the stop for lunch and photos at the top. There is one big problem I had with it though….the stairs. There are  lots of stairs on the Preikestolen hike. They are spread out in sections, but many of those sections and quite steep, and can be very uneven since they are made of slabs that are carved out of the mountain. This is just me, but I would have rather repeated Kjerag’s chains and rock faces than slog up a bunch of stairs. Stairs are my nemesis.

 

Despite the stairs, we made it up pretty quickly, and holy cow. The view from the top was incredible. Kjerag was amazing because it was high up and challenging and you could stand on a rock and look down to the fjord. But Preikestolen is amazing because you are right there looking out over the fjord as the whole thing opens up in front of you. Just beware, you may have to wait an hour or more for your chance at a photo on the tip of the pulpit!