The Pack https://thepack.unm.edu Student Stories at The University of New Mexico Thu, 10 Sep 2020 22:35:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.1 71725995 From Mentee to Mentor https://thepack.unm.edu/anna-j/from-mentee-to-mentor/ https://thepack.unm.edu/anna-j/from-mentee-to-mentor/#respond Thu, 10 Sep 2020 22:35:21 +0000 https://thepack.unm.edu/?p=17737 This semester I made the switch from being a mentee to becoming a mentor. For the last two years, I was a mentee in the ESS STEM mentoring program. I have had three different mentors who were all local professionals (two from Sandia National Labs and one for the Air Force Research Laboratory). This year […]

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This semester I made the switch from being a mentee to becoming a mentor. For the last two years, I was a mentee in the ESS STEM mentoring program. I have had three different mentors who were all local professionals (two from Sandia National Labs and one for the Air Force Research Laboratory). This year I am still a mentee in the program, but I have decided to also take on the mentor role with the UNM Honors College Pathmaker Mentorship program and ESS Peer Mentorship Program.

The Differences

There are a lot of differences between being a mentee and being a mentor. I think the main thing which is somewhat intuitive is that when I am a mentor the conversations are no longer about me or my career goals. This seems silly but it is something that I try to keep in mind when I reach out to my mentees. I want them to know I am there for them and I know that what I do isn’t necessarily going to help them reach their career goals.

The Meetings

I think another difference is the frequency and depth of each connection. I normally have 30 minutes to an hour meeting with my mentor at least once a month. With both the peer mentoring programs, the exchanges are at the most monthly and it is primarily via email. I have been asked for advice through Instagram DMs and Discord messages. It is more casual and at times easier to connect.

The Similarities

The largest similarity is that we all are connecting with each other for advice and support. I always enjoy getting to know my new mentors and I similarly love getting to know my mentees. I think in both cases each mentorship is like a professional friendship.

Takeaways

I think that all these programs and both roles are beneficial for me as I continue through school. Some of my mentor’s advice is more relevant as I get closer to entering the workforce and I am able to share some tips and tricks I have picked up over the last two years to share with incoming Lobos. I get to meet more people and make more friends in my campus community. Maybe the greatest advantage of all the programs is that they all provide opportunities for me to stay involved in UNM and stay social during this socially distant time.

I hope you are finding ways to connect, learn, and share advice!

Anna

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First Week of Online Classes https://thepack.unm.edu/anna-j/first-week-of-online-classes/ https://thepack.unm.edu/anna-j/first-week-of-online-classes/#respond Mon, 24 Aug 2020 22:58:37 +0000 https://thepack.unm.edu/?p=17681 This has been an odd first week of classes for me. It feels as if I have everything to do and nowhere new to be all at the same time. I have all online courses this semester, so I really am not going anywhere new all week. I am not catching up with classmates before […]

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This has been an odd first week of classes for me. It feels as if I have everything to do and nowhere new to be all at the same time. I have all online courses this semester, so I really am not going anywhere new all week. I am not catching up with classmates before lecture. I am not meeting up with my friends at the Duck Pond for lunch. But I still have a full course load and am working at my second job. I am even doing more extracurricular activities in the Lobo community than in the last two years. So, I am really confused about starting my fifth semester of college.

Let’s reflect

Before I let you know how my whole week has been a long, frustrating “uggggggg,” I do want to think about my first week of my very first semester of classes. It was my second week ever being in New Mexico and everything seemed just as confusing. My classes all started raring to go where other dorm-mates were cruising through syllabus week. By day two, I was already spending three to four hours on homework. At the same time, all my newly made friends were hanging out in each other’s rooms. They were watching movies and going down to the Hokona Cellar to play ping pong and pool.

Things I learned back then

In that first week, I really started to believe college wasn’t meant for me. Why do I have all this material and everyone else can go hang out and socialize? At the time, I didn’t know; 1) I had a lot to learn about time management and working efficiently and 2) it isn’t fair to expect to be able to do everything that everyone else is doing when you all have very different classes and course loads.

Where I’m at now

So back to my all too confusing first week of school. I already feel stretched so very thin, but I am so very staying in the same place my entire day. I am ending one Zoom call just to begin another one. In my free 10 minutes before classes, I start to cram homework or finish student organization tasks. I am having 12-hour days, but I am doing it without moving an inch. I am confused by how exhausted I can feel by the end of the day after not doing anything at all.

My Solution

It is confusing, but I think the solution is going back to what I needed to learn in my first semester. It is not fair to expect yourself to do everything. While now it’s not a comparison between me and my friends in the dorms, it is a comparison between me this Fall and last Fall BP (before pandemic). Usually, I run around everywhere on campus, hoping in my car to drive to work in the middle of the day and coming back to attend what seems like a billion meetings. Now that I am staying in one place all day, my body is ready to go but my mind is in overdrive.

Takeaways

Being mindful and remembering that this is a whole different semester is something that I hope will help me. I plan to take a few extra deep breaths and schedule in extra time for self-care and hopefully the want to scream and sleep at the same time will be less intense. I am going to try to move around more during the day and keep doing my at home workouts.

This time, I don’t have solid advice, but I can say you are not alone if this start to the semester is weird.

Good luck navigating this new semester and don’t forget to take a deep breath,

Anna

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Fall 2020 Move-In https://thepack.unm.edu/anna-j/fall-2020-move-in/ https://thepack.unm.edu/anna-j/fall-2020-move-in/#respond Mon, 10 Aug 2020 21:25:28 +0000 https://thepack.unm.edu/?p=17672 It is move-in time! We are one week away from the beginning of the Fall 2020 semester and UNM Housing’s move-in started last Friday. For the last two years, I packed all my stuff up and moved into the dorms. This year, at this time, is much less exciting. In March, I moved off-campus to […]

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It is move-in time! We are one week away from the beginning of the Fall 2020 semester and UNM Housing’s move-in started last Friday. For the last two years, I packed all my stuff up and moved into the dorms. This year, at this time, is much less exciting. In March, I moved off-campus to a place I plan on staying in until I graduate. This is not the same for a lot of my peers though. Many people are moving either on or off-campus and even a little early due to COVID-19. Here are some of their experiences!

Shane

Shane is a junior majoring in music with a concentration in vocal performance. He has lived the last two years on campus in a traditional style dorm. This year, he has moved off-campus. He moved in around the same time as ResLife started their move-in process to allow for the standard 14 days of self-quarantine before his in-person course starts.

Shane On-Campus

How has the move-in process changed from living on campus to living off campus?

Shane told me that the main difference is how many more things there are to consider with his own place. He has had to think about things such as getting furniture and researching wireless plans. A lot of the resources that are explained to you by a resident advisor (RA) are aspects of living that Shane has had to figure out by himself. It is not necessarily bad though. He talked about how it is helping him be more independent like a “final exam for being an adult.”

Larissa

Larissa is a senior majoring in child studies and minoring in psychology. This will be her fourth year living on campus and third year as an RA. She was previously living on campus during the summer, so she described her moving process as a little weird. Since she never really left campus, she told me it was more like she was switching rooms instead.

Larissa and friends at Friday Night Live

How has the move-in process changed due to COVID-19?

For me, coronavirus was the main reason I moved out of the dorms. I had short notice and I moved quickly. But I was able to have three people help me which is different from what current on-campus movers are experiencing. Larissa talked to me about how residents now only are allowed one extra person to help them move in. Everyone must wear masks and once move-in dies down, residents are only allowed one guest in their room all semester. Shane has experienced that same, slower process of move-in but when it comes to waiting in lines to get into stores to buy apartment necessities and groceries.

What will you miss most about a traditional on-campus move-in experience?

Shane immediately told me he would miss “all the free things.”  When I moved in with ResLife, I normally got a free swag back. If you participate in some of the events leading up to and during the first week of school, you can get so many free things. Larissa talked about missing these events such as the Olympiad, Friday Night Live, and Red Rally. During the Student Activity Center’s Welcome Back Days, student orgs. table and give candy and stickers to students walking by, UNM T-shirts are constantly being handed out, and you could probably get enough free food to eat breakfast, lunch and dinner for the whole month of August.

Takeaways

I agree with them. I will miss all of the events and all of the free stuff at those events. There is something really fun about moving in at the same time as all my friends and catching up with them about their summer. Even though things are different, I feel fortunate that I can just stay put this August. I moved about six times in the last two years to different places on campus and there is something relaxing about finally recycling my go-to moving boxes.

Safe travels back to ABQ and good luck moving in!

Anna

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New Life Chapters https://thepack.unm.edu/victoria-p/new-life-chapters/ https://thepack.unm.edu/victoria-p/new-life-chapters/#respond Tue, 28 Jul 2020 19:52:51 +0000 https://thepack.unm.edu/?p=17659 A big chapter in my life has ended, and it ended a lot faster than I thought it would. If you have been following my blog posts, you know that I have recently graduated from my undergrad at UNM. My undergrad at UNM has been a large part of me and my journey. I came […]

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A big chapter in my life has ended, and it ended a lot faster than I thought it would. If you have been following my blog posts, you know that I have recently graduated from my undergrad at UNM.

My undergrad at UNM has been a large part of me and my journey. I came from a small town with only one high school. Coming to Albuquerque gave me the opportunity to figure out who I want to be and grow into a better version of myself.

This growth came from friendships, classes, and work environments. At UNM, I have met my closest, lifelong friends, and have many late-night memories that I will never forget. I had classes whose lessons will follow me everywhere I go. And I have gained work experience that I could not have found elsewhere.

These experiences, I will take with me forever.

Moving forward, I’ll still be continuing my journey at UNM. This time around, I will be going to school as a grad student and earning my master’s in Spanish.

I was lucky enough to be offered a full-ride for my master’s degree. Through my scholarship and teaching introductory levels of Spanish in UNM’s Department of Spanish and Portuguese, I will be able to live comfortably for the next two years.

While I am glad my time at UNM will be able to continue, I am sad that my undergrad has come to a close. Your undergrad is very unique, and you will never be able to experience anything like it again.

As my time blogging has come to a close, I would like to leave some advice. During your undergrad, find a balance of fun and school. Undergrad is one of the very few times that you can go full steam on school and fun without feeling entirely drained (sometimes). Take advantage of this before you have to work a full-time job. Experience your undergrad to the fullest extent meaning attend games, go to school events, and spend as much time with friends as possible.

That being said my time blogging has come to an end. Go Lobos and goodbye.

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SAC Virtual Student Organization Fair https://thepack.unm.edu/anna-j/sac-virtual-student-organization-fair/ https://thepack.unm.edu/anna-j/sac-virtual-student-organization-fair/#respond Sat, 18 Jul 2020 22:00:00 +0000 https://thepack.unm.edu/?p=17650 As a leader in the Society of Women Engineers (SWE), I have a really cool opportunity to participate in a Virtual Student Organization Fair put on by the Student Activities Center (SAC) this week. On July 23, a number of ethnic/cultural, academic/departmental, political, and honorary groups will meet incoming Lobos to introduce their organizations. SAC […]

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As a leader in the Society of Women Engineers (SWE), I have a really cool opportunity to participate in a Virtual Student Organization Fair put on by the Student Activities Center (SAC) this week. On July 23, a number of ethnic/cultural, academic/departmental, political, and honorary groups will meet incoming Lobos to introduce their organizations. SAC has already held an info session for special interest sports/rec, religious, and service organizations on June 25. After my student organization meeting, on August 6th, SAC will hold their last fair with the Associated Students of UNM student government and its agencies.

UNM Student Organizations

UNM has over 400 chartered student organizations. To be chartered means that the university formally recognizes the group as a UNM student organization. There are a lot of organizations and they are all well listed by SAC on the Student Org List. This list normally contains a bio about the org, the president, advisors, and contact information. Student organizations are a great way to not only be involved in the Lobo community but also make great connections and gain leadership experience in areas that may or may not be directly connected to your major.

Virtual New Student Orientation

This event is offered as an extra event for NSO To-Go. The event helps new Lobos feel prepared for life as a UNM student and strengthens incoming students’ understanding that UNM is a diverse campus and there is something for everyone that extends past just their post-secondary education.

The Details

The fair is designed to allow students to meet with the organizations in small break-out rooms and really get to know the group. This was implemented to imitate the normally huge student organization outdoor fair during NSO. There are also other big recruitment events such as Friday Night Live and Welcome Back Days that are key for organizations to gain members, but with the current pandemic, it looks like they may also take shape in a different way. So, this event is a pretty great event for student organizations to reach out to the new students in this uncertain time.

Takeaways

I would encourage you all to check this out, especially if you are an incoming Lobo! While things are different than when I was a new student, if I didn’t meet student organizations at these types of fairs, I wouldn’t have known to join communities like SWE, ASUNM’s Emerging Lobo Leaders, or the Honors College Honors Student Association.

My freshman year and my friends now would be totally different without these experiences. Student organizations really help you make the most of your Lobo experience and, especially during this pandemic, can help you feel connected in this uncertain time.

Anna

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Moving During a Pandemic Part II: Storage Hacks in my Quirky Albuquerque Home https://thepack.unm.edu/victoria-p/moving-during-a-pandemic-part-ii-storage-hacks-in-my-quirky-albuquerque-home/ https://thepack.unm.edu/victoria-p/moving-during-a-pandemic-part-ii-storage-hacks-in-my-quirky-albuquerque-home/#respond Wed, 15 Jul 2020 23:33:00 +0000 https://thepack.unm.edu/?p=17644 During my college career, I have lived in many places on and near campus. However, many houses around campus are older and really lack storage. Because of that, you have to get creative with your storage techniques. I wrote down a few that have helped me. 1. Chests are everything. Chests are simple and stylish […]

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During my college career, I have lived in many places on and near campus. However, many houses around campus are older and really lack storage. Because of that, you have to get creative with your storage techniques. I wrote down a few that have helped me.

1. Chests are everything.

Chests are simple and stylish and come with lots of storage inside.

2. Shelves, Shelves, Shelves.

Shelves, especially in kitchens, open up lots of cabinet spaces. It’s cute to leave some of your spices on top of them.

3. Hang your drying rack.

Counter space is everything. Hanging a drying rack over the sink opens up that space.

4. Find innovative ways to store your pots and pans. 

Pots and pans take up a lot more space than you think. Having a pot hanging rack is stylish and convenient.

5. Renovate storage closest to meet your needs.

I needed more room for my clothes. I simply took out the shelves in this closet and made a fun new way to hang some clothes.

6. Platform beds are your best friends. 

A simple trip to the container store and a platform bed will fix many storage problems.

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Gates of Lodore https://thepack.unm.edu/anna-j/gates-of-lodore/ https://thepack.unm.edu/anna-j/gates-of-lodore/#respond Tue, 14 Jul 2020 18:02:00 +0000 https://thepack.unm.edu/?p=17619 This weekend I took a trip to Wyoming. I was there about this time last year and took a trip to visit Dinosaur National Monument. I visited the Utah part of the monument where a large quarry of dinosaur fossils is on display. This time, I went back to Dinosaur National Monument but in the […]

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This weekend I took a trip to Wyoming. I was there about this time last year and took a trip to visit Dinosaur National Monument. I visited the Utah part of the monument where a large quarry of dinosaur fossils is on display. This time, I went back to Dinosaur National Monument but in the northern part of the space found in Colorado: Gates of Lodore.

History of Gates of Lodore

Gates of Lodore was named after a poem, “Cataract of Lodore,” by Robert Southey. The canyon was named during the Powell Expedition in 1869. The expedition was led by John Wesley Powell. Powell and a team followed the Green River from Green River, Wyoming through parts of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona. It is the first record of river passage through the Grand Canyon. The Gates of Lodore mark one of the most dangerous parts of their journey. During and after their passage through the canyon, the team crashed one of their boats from dangerous rapids.

Modern Day Gates of Lodore

Today, there is a small, primitive camping site in The Gates of Lodore managed by the National Parks Service. It is just one of the many campsites in the Browns Park area.

There were pit toilets, water, picnic tables, fire pits, and bear safe containers to store food near or at all sites. It was $10 a night to stay and the site filled up fast. The place is popular for rafters to stay as they recreate the entirety or parts of the expedition.

My Experience

I had a really great time staying here. The weather was warm but there was a good breeze. I set up a camp chair and got to take in the scenery around me all day. There is a small out and back hike that is about a mile-long total. The hike takes you out closer to the canyon and I got a really great picture of it.

I walked down to the boat ramp a few times to take a closer look at the Green River, but many rafters were setting up for what looked to be a pretty long trip.

Takeaways

Overall, it was a great place to camp. It was breathtaking in all directions and the perfect place to totally zone out from the world. I still stayed COVID safe by maintaining 6 feet distance from campers and making sure I sanitized the surfaces I used. It was a nice place to escape the craziness of the pandemic for just one night. Along the way, I also got to see some antelope and the way back to where I was staying this weekend, I spotted elk and deer. It was a good break from the norm, especially with only two more weeks until Summer semester finals.

I hope you were able to escape to nature this last weekend,

Anna

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Moving During a Pandemic https://thepack.unm.edu/victoria-p/moving-during-a-pandemic/ https://thepack.unm.edu/victoria-p/moving-during-a-pandemic/#respond Mon, 06 Jul 2020 18:28:00 +0000 https://thepack.unm.edu/?p=17599 One of the disadvantages of being in college is that moving is a frequent task. In my experience, I have not lived in one place for more than ten months. On the bright side, you become really good at packing. That, however, does not make the packing any less painful. There is something about packing […]

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One of the disadvantages of being in college is that moving is a frequent task. In my experience, I have not lived in one place for more than ten months. On the bright side, you become really good at packing.

That, however, does not make the packing any less painful. There is something about packing where the more you pack, the less finished you feel. This will be the third house I will have lived in during my time in Albuquerque. The struggle you have to deal with is the more you live on your own, the more junk you accumulate. Because of those two things, I have a lot of junk to pack.

Because we are in the midst of a pandemic, I ran into the problem that I couldn’t get the necessary furniture I needed. Because of this, much of my furniture has been built by my dad. He’s built us chests, a bed frame, clothing racks and more. Building furniture is one of my favorite things.

Hand Built Bed Frame

This is for two reasons. The first being your furniture is always unique. You will know that no one else will have a piece of furniture that looks like yours. There is also a sense of pride when you use something that you built/helped build.

Luckily for me, I am moving within Albuquerque. So, this means, I just have to pack up one house and move everything 10 minutes down the road. Because of this, we did not end up renting a moving truck. Instead, we just got a couple of friends and some trucks and made several trips across town. 

The last struggle I ran into is unpacking. My new house lacks a lot of storage. So, I had to figure out many storage hacks and figuring out how to keep my many things put away. I also tend to get very overwhelmed unpacking because it requires a lot of decisions on where things should go.

Nevertheless, I was able to fully unpack within 48 hours which is a feat that I did not think was possible. Happy moving to anyone else who is planning on moving soon.

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My Third of July in Santa Fe https://thepack.unm.edu/anna-j/my-third-of-july-in-santa-fe/ https://thepack.unm.edu/anna-j/my-third-of-july-in-santa-fe/#respond Mon, 06 Jul 2020 14:31:50 +0000 https://thepack.unm.edu/?p=17600 With COVID-19 cases rising, I knew this 4th of July would be different. Last summer I went to Blanding, Utah to meet up with an old high school friend and have a nice camping trip. Between the summer class, work and planning on leaving town soon, I needed a low-key, socially distant Independence Day celebration. […]

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With COVID-19 cases rising, I knew this 4th of July would be different. Last summer I went to Blanding, Utah to meet up with an old high school friend and have a nice camping trip. Between the summer class, work and planning on leaving town soon, I needed a low-key, socially distant Independence Day celebration. The solution was a day trip to Santa Fe with two close friends.

The Drive

Santa Fe is the capital of New Mexico. I have visited twice before. The first time was for a day trip to explore downtown and the second time was to see Meow Wolf. It is about an hour’s drive on I-25. The trip always seems to go super-fast and I always wonder why I don’t go visit Santa Fe more often.

The Hike

The first stop was a small walking path by the Santa Fe River. We picked up coffee at Java Joe’s right before we headed toward the start of the path. There were a good number of people on the path. We made sure we took face coverings on the hike. It was a pretty short hike, but it was fun to get outside. The weather was really nice, and the path had lots of shade.

Lunch

The next stop on our trip was to take a walk downtown. We wanted to check out some of the outdoor shops. Right as we found a parking spot, it started to rain. We decided to just do a drive around downtown after the rain and grab lunch instead.

We ate at Taco Fundación. It was super good! I got some street tacos and we all ate outside under a patio covering to watch it rain. There were others out eating under the covering, but we all had at least one table between us.

Canyon Road

After lunch, we checked out Canyon Road. This is where there are a lot of art galleries and outdoor art exhibits in the same place. We were able to go in and out of galleries and look around. Some of my favorite galleries had paintings displaying magical realism or large sculpture gardens.

Heading Home

The last stop before we headed back to ABQ was Shake Foundation. We made the short drive back home and got dinner ready for a socially distant picnic with some friends in town for the Fourth.

My friends and I at Shake Foundation

Takeaways

This was a really fun trip and a great way to feel festive, stay socially distant, and still have fun. We always had face masks on, and we sanitized a lot. While we walked around on the hike and on Canyon Road, we made sure to leave lots of room between us and anyone else out if we had to cross paths. We also traveled with Clorox wipes and used them a good amount.

The trip did really highlight how traveling even an hour away has really changed because of coronavirus. But, all of the things we had planned made social distancing possible, and I still feel that I had the same amount of fun that I would have had if the virus wasn’t a concern.

I hope you all had a safe holiday and have found ways to have fun in a pandemic.

Anna

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Maxwell Museum Online https://thepack.unm.edu/anna-j/maxwell-museum-online/ https://thepack.unm.edu/anna-j/maxwell-museum-online/#respond Mon, 29 Jun 2020 15:25:34 +0000 https://thepack.unm.edu/?p=17594 During the pandemic, UNM had moved to limited operations. This included closing the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology to the public. The museum is located on the central campus, west of the duck pond. I have found myself in the museum two or three times to check out the exhibits. The museum is free for everyone, […]

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During the pandemic, UNM had moved to limited operations. This included closing the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology to the public. The museum is located on the central campus, west of the duck pond. I have found myself in the museum two or three times to check out the exhibits. The museum is free for everyone, not just UNM students and they accept donations. As Maxwell closed its doors to the public’s in-person visits, they have added to their online exhibits.

Image of the Front of the Museum from Museum’s Website: https://maxwellmuseum.unm.edu/

The Online Exhibits

The current exhibits they have are “COVID-19: Concepts of Sickness and Wellness,” “2019 Chile Wars,” “Chinese Americans in New Mexico,” “China Then and Now,” and “Heritage New Mexico.” Each exhibit is opened on a new webpage. The exhibits layouts differ but most have multiple pages of information and images about the topic.

COVID-19: Concepts of Sickness and Wellness

The coronavirus exhibit was really cool to read about. The exhibit focuses on sickness and wellness throughout history and asks for the readers’ individual story. It also provides updates and pictures of current statistics and events associated with the pandemic today. The most interesting articles to me were under sickness where they included articles from The Navajo Times on previous epidemics.

I found the images depicting wellness dances such as The Grass Dance or The Jingle Dance super interesting. There was even a video of the Jingle Dress Dance. I also really liked learning how colonization led to the spread of disease (specifically the Rio Grande Drainage). All the pages include references which are great to use to do even more research. A really neat touch to the exhibit was asking the readers for their own anecdote of living during the pandemic. They intend to eventually publish the response in the exhibit.

Online Education

The museum also has really great links for expanding digital learning. Their education resources page has plenty of links and online print outs for home instruction. I checked out the “World Music and Folk Instruments” PDF which teaches the reader to make homemade instruments such as a rain stick or maracas. These print outs are in addition to some great handouts and worksheets that pertain to their museum exhibits and some interesting classroom curriculum and lesson plans.

Takeaways

I encourage you all to check an exhibit out. While we are all at home, teleworking, and social distancing, reading the articles and web pages associated with the online exhibits is a great way to pass time. Especially in a time where it seems like you can’t talk about anything else but what is in the news with friends or family, learning new facts from these exhibits can be a fun way to keep the conversation new and interesting.

Anna

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“Let’s Do a Wellness Check” https://thepack.unm.edu/anna-j/lets-do-a-wellness-check/ https://thepack.unm.edu/anna-j/lets-do-a-wellness-check/#respond Sun, 21 Jun 2020 20:50:00 +0000 https://thepack.unm.edu/?p=17581 One of the hosts of the podcast I listen to posted a tweet the other night. She checked in on her followers by asking them to do a “wellness check.” Basically, she asked, with everything that has happened (i.e. the pandemic and the protests) how are you doing? I have not been too active as […]

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One of the hosts of the podcast I listen to posted a tweet the other night. She checked in on her followers by asking them to do a “wellness check.” Basically, she asked, with everything that has happened (i.e. the pandemic and the protests) how are you doing? I have not been too active as a Lobo lately. It is hard to be really a part of the community when we all stay home, and any meetings are virtual. So, I am going to do a wellness check.

Where I am now

I am about to start week four of the summer semester. This marks the halfway point of the semester. I have one exam down and two more to go. I am also starting on the 13th week of living in my new house. I moved out of the dorms in March. While the day I moved off campus wasn’t the first day of the statewide stay-in-place, it is my indication of when COVID-19 started to change my day-to-day life.

Where I was before

In March, classes and my job moved to virtual platforms. I was spending all day in the house. I took up home workouts with my roommates and really tried to get out of the house for a weekend hike. For feeling like my days went by so slow, the rest of the Spring semester zoomed by.

The End of the Semester

While classes were online, I still felt connected to the UNM community. I still attended student organization meetings and met with advisors and mentors. After finals, it felt odd. I guess, somewhere in the back of my mind, I thought everything would go back to normal. It was probably the most uneventful end to the semester. I just went back to spending my days in my house and teleworking after classes were done.

The First Signs of Normalcy

The week summer classes started, my other job started to bring back everyone in phases. I had online classes, but I could go into the office to work. It felt like we were back on track to normalcy. Now, more businesses have been able to open. I see more people outside and walking around. I have been more cautious, but I try to go on walks and keep up the home workouts.

Takeaways

I want things to go back. Meeting up with my friends and starting to plan for the next semester with my student orgs. sounds really far away still. Even though I haven’t gone out much, I have found ways to reach out to friends and family. I try to wish them a good day or do a short check-in. So, I am doing good. I am healthy. I am safe. I would love to go hang with friends, volunteer, visit the salon, or practice yoga at a studio, but I will make the most of what I have right now.

Don’t forget to check in with yourself! It is an uncertain time and it is okay to feel not quite like yourself.

Anna

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What I Wish I Would’ve Known as a Freshman https://thepack.unm.edu/victoria-p/what-i-wish-i-wouldve-known-as-a-freshman/ https://thepack.unm.edu/victoria-p/what-i-wish-i-wouldve-known-as-a-freshman/#respond Thu, 18 Jun 2020 15:50:00 +0000 https://thepack.unm.edu/?p=17577 Before I started at UNM, I vividly remember looking at blog posts that described things you should know as a freshman. As someone who has graduated and is naturally a reflective person, I decided to go full circle and make my own list of things I wish I would have known.  1. Don’t be afraid […]

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Before I started at UNM, I vividly remember looking at blog posts that described things you should know as a freshman. As someone who has graduated and is naturally a reflective person, I decided to go full circle and make my own list of things I wish I would have known. 

1. Don’t be afraid to branch out of your friend group. 

Quite a few people who went to my high school went to UNM. Because I was in a new city, it was natural to navigate back to what was normal. However, the whole point of college is finding yourself. And you can’t find yourself if you do not burst old boundaries. So, go meet new people.

2. Open a savings account. 

I had no idea what a savings account was when I came to UNM. Open one. If you have a job, put some of your paycheck in it automatically if you can. While you’re at it, learn that there are limits to transferring money from your savings account. 

3. Take every chance you have to participate in campus events. 

You are only an undergraduate once. Because of that, there is a limited amount of times you can do things before you leave that undergraduate window. In my situation, COVID-19 took a lot of final opportunities away. So, I am glad that I experienced them early on and did not wait for my last year.

4. Avoid Friday and 8 a.m. classes at all costs. 

I understand it is not always possible, but when it is—jump on this opportunity. 

5. The most fun comes from spontaneous outings. 

The fun part about moving away from home is your parents can’t tell you no. So, say yes to the late Wednesday night outings (as so long as they do not get in the way of your classes). 

6. Take professors, not classes. 

Find an enthusiastic professor and stick with them. Those classes can get you out of your comfort zone. 

7. Get to know your professors. 

They are people too. Also, you never know when a good letter of recommendation will come in handy (it’s a lot more often than you think). 

8. Don’t wait for your advisor to reach out to you. 

UNM has things like LoboTrax for a reason.  Track where you are at in your degree, and if you have questions, reach out to your advisor so you have a clear path and plan.

9. Complete your degree at your own pace. 

In college, you are not in competition with anyone else. Take the time you need for your degree. 

Good luck future Lobos!

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NSO To-Go! https://thepack.unm.edu/anna-j/nso-to-go/ https://thepack.unm.edu/anna-j/nso-to-go/#respond Wed, 10 Jun 2020 20:19:00 +0000 https://thepack.unm.edu/?p=17563 COVID-19 had disrupted a lot. Classes have moved online, and work is being done at home. A new Lobo’s first impression of UNM has also changed. Most of my friends and I experienced an on-campus New Student Orientation (NSO). It was marked by staying in the dorms and listening to lectures in Woodward Hall with […]

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COVID-19 had disrupted a lot. Classes have moved online, and work is being done at home. A new Lobo’s first impression of UNM has also changed. Most of my friends and I experienced an on-campus New Student Orientation (NSO). It was marked by staying in the dorms and listening to lectures in Woodward Hall with hundreds of other students we had never met before. Incoming students are experiencing something new: NSO To-Go!

My Introduction to NSO To-Go

After talking to Jose Villar, the director of NSO, I would say NSO To-Go captures the essence of my NSO experience two years ago and puts it online for easy access and use. I first heard about NSO To-Go after being asked to create a student organization video for the Society of Women Engineers (SWE). This video was to go up on the Virtual Discover Fair page. It is meant to help recruit these new lobos going through the digital NSO. Mr. Villar, however, told me this was just a small part of this new orientation.

What is NSO To-Go?

The virtual orientation is made up of self-paced learning modules and virtual presentations and information sessions. The orientation is still done in a number of sessions throughout the summer. And, because it is online, the new lobos can stay engaged throughout the whole summer. There are still NSO leaders and the orientation still covers the same topics that I learned in-person.

Virtual NSO spans four days. The schedule above with some additional information sent out to the students. They must complete the learning modules (“Welcome home, Lobo,” “Advising 1101,” “Welcome to your College/School,” and “The Grey Area”). But, ultimately, they have the entire summer to learn about UNM. They can sign up for info sessions about things such as CAPS Tutoring, Meal Plans, and the Student Activity Center. Incoming students can take virtual campus tours or visit the Virtual Discover Fair where academic support programs, UNM resources, and student organizations introduce themselves.

Advantages of NSO To-Go

While going digital doesn’t allow the new students to visit campus or meet new friends and advisors in person, there are some really great opportunities for new Lobos. Students, since the NSO To-Go site is up all summer, can checkout resources and info sessions all summer. This means, you can show your whole family the campus by doing a virtual tour together or pacing yourself through all the student organization videos.

I think the greatest advantage of the digital NSO is the mobility. When I was going through NSO, I had to be a part of the last session. I couldn’t afford two plane tickets to ABQ being an out-of-state student. This was great for my budget since I could fly out once and just stay in ABQ until the start of the semester, but it made it really hard for me to register for the classes I wanted. You register for classes near the end of your NSO session. So, by the time I had the chance to register for mine, almost every student had already registered. The virtual NSO doesn’t require a plane ticket and when the switch was revealed, Mr. Villar told me the students even got the option to move to a sooner NSO session.

Takeaways

The orientation can be done anywhere with a good network connection and you don’t miss out on the main vibe of NSO. You get the same information from the comfort and safety of your home. You can take your time to get acquainted with the school and reach out to student organizations or resources you may want to learn more about or participate in. I think the site is even helpful for current students who may be interested in learning more about what UNM has to offer.

I hope to see the new Lobos on campus soon, but, in the meantime, enjoy your virtual orientation!

Anna

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Summer Courses: Part 2 https://thepack.unm.edu/anna-j/summer-courses-part-2/ https://thepack.unm.edu/anna-j/summer-courses-part-2/#respond Sat, 06 Jun 2020 20:25:00 +0000 https://thepack.unm.edu/?p=17556 Summer courses for Summer 2020 started on June 1st. Last Summer semester, I took two classes. They were both online courses and totaled four credit hours. This semester, I am taking on class for four credit hours. While it was not originally supposed to be online, COVID-19 has moved it to the digital platform. Some […]

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Summer courses for Summer 2020 started on June 1st. Last Summer semester, I took two classes. They were both online courses and totaled four credit hours. This semester, I am taking on class for four credit hours. While it was not originally supposed to be online, COVID-19 has moved it to the digital platform.

Some Differences

The first difference is that this summer, there are Zoom calls during the originally scheduled in-class lectures. With both the courses that were designed to be online last summer, they did not require a specific time where all the students need to tune in. These two classes that were designed to be online relied more on videos or discussion boards to make up for this direct lecture time. This was super helpful last summer since I was working 40 hours a week at my summer internship. I could get my coursework done whenever I had the time. This summer, I am just continuing the part-time work I was doing during the semester. Therefore, I knew I could design my work schedule around my school schedule.

Some Similarities

First, summer classes are always taught at a fast pace. The summer semester is only half the time of a regular semester. This can mean that the material may be harder to grasp because there is less time spent on each topic. So, I can already expect this next class to be a bit fast.

Specific to my experience, all of my Summer courses have been online. Because of this, there is something that is comforting. Going to virtual classes when we went online in the Spring was, honestly, terrible. Many of my professors were not prepared (rightfully so) because of the quick switch to online. I was also taking 18 credit hours in the Spring. What that meant for me was not leaving the dining room table for 9+ hours a day. I had a very short attention span.

I fully admit that I would have had a lot easier time learning if I had in-person courses. But, as I know from last summer, the quality of my learning isn’t nearly as impacted as when I take fewer credit hours.

Summer Expectations

I have a little more hope that I will have a closer to normal experience learning because of the smaller number of credit hours I am taking. I also have learned from the last 8-weeks of the Spring semester that I need to move around every so often. Staying in the same place during the lectures, homework, and office hours is not recommended.

Change it up by studying on your bed and with a furry friend!

I also expect to work a good bit because the class was designed to be in person. This means showing up to every class and keeping myself accountable during the lectures. (No mid-class Twitter breaks). I expect to do my homework a few extra days before it’s due. This will give me enough time to reach out to my professor or lab lecturer with questions. I also need to factor in response time if I email them questions (It is unrealistic to expect anyone to reply to late-night emails right away and even more so in the summer.)

Takeaways

I am looking forward to this summer’s class. With one week down, I am already 12.5% done with the semester! Between the change to virtual learning and the quick teaching pace, this specific class might be a little harder than it would be in a pre-pandemic 16-week semester. However, I can concentrate my time on this single class instead of spreading it between five or six classes.

I hope you are also excited about your summer courses if you happen to be taking them this year!

Stay sane, healthy, and safe!

Anna

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We Need To Do More https://thepack.unm.edu/victoria-p/we-need-to-do-more/ https://thepack.unm.edu/victoria-p/we-need-to-do-more/#respond Tue, 02 Jun 2020 23:07:00 +0000 https://thepack.unm.edu/?p=17552 Today’s current climate is not one that is easy to talk about, but that does not mean we do not talk about it. One thing I learned at the University of New Mexico is that in situations where you are the most uncomfortable you learn the most. Another thing that I learned from my peers […]

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Today’s current climate is not one that is easy to talk about, but that does not mean we do not talk about it. One thing I learned at the University of New Mexico is that in situations where you are the most uncomfortable you learn the most. Another thing that I learned from my peers is that when something is not right, you must do something to fix it.

On May 25, 2020, George Floyd– an unarmed Black Man– was murdered at the hands of police sparking outrage across the country. Every single state in the nation held protests; however, many of these protests were met with even more police brutality. This paints the stark reality of our country. Systematic racism is alive and well.

What happened to George Floyd is not the case of a couple bad apples. Breonna Taylor. Sandra Bland. Mike Brown. Tamir Rice. Philando Castile. There are so many more names, and so many we will not be aware of because their deaths were covered up.

Our Black community has faced the realities of white supremacy since the foundation of this country. White supremacy has changed its face over the years, but still exists whether it exists as police brutality, an unequal justice system, micro-aggressions from their peers, and so much more.

As a community, we need to do so much more than say we stand in solidarity to with Black Lives Matter. Words without actions mean nothing. We can donate. We can give resources to people in pain. We can sign petitions. We can hold our institutions and governments accountable. Not for clout, but because we live in a society that claims all people are created equal, yet time and time again our peers are not treated as such.

As a university, I want to call on all of us to be anti-racist. That means learning about micro-aggressions and calling out people who use them on campus. We need to go to the Student Fee Review Board and demand that funding is going to departments that benefit disadvantaged communities. We also need to fall back on the Office of Equal Opportunity to report anything that creates a negative campus environment.

As someone who is white-passing, I will never understand the harsh realities people of color have to face. However, that does not mean I turn my back on them.

Be hyper aware of the realities our Black community faces. Uplift Black voices and have hard conversations with the people around you. Black Lives Matter.

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